Your Health

Find answers to some common health questions that you may have during your time at Edinburgh Napier.

For specific information and updates on the Coronavirus please visit our Latest on Covid-19 page.

For comprehensive information on all health and wellbeing matters visit NHS information for students.

 
 

Allergies

If you suffer from allergies the Preparing for and Managing Your Allergies at University booklet provides some great information and top tips to empower people living with severe allergies to be more confidently in control of their lives.

Dentist

It is important that you register with a dentist and have a check up at least every six months. Visit Getting NHS dental treatment in Scotland for more information, and to find a dentist visit Find your local services on NHS 24.

Diabetes

If you have diabetes, or would like to know more about diabetes, the following links will give you information.

My Diabetes My Way is an informative website for people with diabetes and health care professionals. For people registered at a diabetes clinic in Scotland, access to personal data such as HbA1c, weight, BP, cholesterol is available by opening an account on MDMY.

On MDMW, a section called Understanding Diabetes is an interactive site that gives information especially aimed at students and young people with diabetes. Topics include: leaving home, student life, exercise, alcohol, travel, illness, stress, gigs and festivals, smoking, illicit drug use, driving, mood, and long-term complications.

In NHS Lothian there a few hospitals that provide diabetes services; Western General Hospital, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Roodlands Hospital, St Johns Hospital, and Leith Community Treatment Trust. The Edinburgh Centre for Endocrinology and Diabetes will give you information.

If you have any questions about being a student and having diabetes, you can contact Jacqui Charlton, who is a Lecturer and Specialist Nurse in Diabetes. Jacqui is based at ENU Sighthill campus, and also the Western General Hospital. Please get in touch if you need any support or advice: j.charlton@napier.ac.uk.

We are also in the process of starting a diabetes support group, and if you would like information please contact Jacqui.

Doctors

It's really important that all of our students register with a doctor as soon as they join us. It will mean that you can easily access a doctor if you need to and will also make it easier for the University to support you if you suffer any mental health issues.

There is no National Health Service General Practitioner (GP) service available in the University. To find your nearest GP visit 'Find your local services' on NHS 24.

Emergencies

In an emergency phone 999 for the emergency services (police, ambulance, fire brigade or coastguard).

Health & Safety

Visit the Health & Safety pages for more information.

Hospitals

To find your nearest hospital in Edinburgh visit Find your local services on NHS 24.

Measles

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can be very unpleasant and can sometimes lead to serious complications. However, it's now uncommon in the UK because of the effectiveness of the MMR vaccination. The initial symptoms of measles develop around 10 days after you are infected.

These can include:

  • cold-like symptoms
  • red eyes and sensitivity to light
  • a high temperature (fever)
  • greyish white spots in the mouth and throat

After a few days, a red-brown spotty rash will appear. This usually starts behind the ears and then spreads around the head and neck before spreading to the rest of the body.

Read more about the symptoms of measles.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) immunisation- for all students

Measles, mumps and rubella are highly infectious conditions that can have serious and potentially fatal complications.  The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine that protects against the three separate illnesses, in a single injection. The full course of the MMR vaccination requires two doses and should be given at least 4 weeks apart.  It is likely that you will have received one MMR immunisation as a baby or a child, but it is advised to check with your GP before arriving at University if both doses have been administered.

If you have not received the MMR vaccine before leaving for University, you can register with a new GP practice once you arrive and arrange to get the vaccine here as soon as possible.

Mumps

Mumps is a contagious viral infection that used to be common in children. It’s most recognisable by the painful swellings at the side of the face under the ears (the parotid glands), giving a person with mumps a distinctive "hamster face" appearance.

Other symptoms include:

  • headache
  • joint pain
  • high temperature, which may develop a few days before the swelling of the parotid glands.
Read more about the symptoms of mumps.
 
Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) immunisation- for all students
Measles, mumps and rubella are highly infectious conditions that can have serious and potentially fatal complications.  The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine that protects against the three separate illnesses, in a single injection. The full course of the MMR vaccination requires two doses and should be given at least 4 weeks apart.  It is likely that you will have received one MMR immunisation as a baby or a child, but it is advised to check with your GP before arriving at University if both doses have been administered.

If you have not received the MMR vaccine before leaving for University, you can register with a new GP practice once you arrive and arrange to get the vaccine here as soon as possible.

Opticians

One of the occupational hazards of the intense concentrations that students have to endure is eye strain, and a whole assortment of eye problems. Everyone should visit an optician at least once a year. To find an optician visit Find your local services on NHS 24.

Personal Emergency Evacuation Plans (PEEPs)

If you have a disability, long term health condition or a temporary health condition that is likely to affect how quickly and safely you can exit University buildings in an emergency, you may need information about our evacuation procedures and a personal evacuation plan;  for example, if you are a wheelchair user or have significant mobility, vision or hearing problems. You may also need information and a plan in other circumstances, for example if you have a broken limb or you are pregnant and this is affecting your mobility.

In the first instance, you can discuss PEEP information with an Adviser in the Disability & Inclusion Team. You may also need to discuss evacuation procedures with an Accommodation Officer if you are staying in University accommodation. 
 
A PEEP ensures you have clearly explained information detailing what you need to do in the event of a fire or other emergency evacuation; for health and safety reasons, this must be completed either prior to, or soon after you join the University.   If you think you need a PEEP and this is not in place within four weeks of joining the University, please raise this with the Disability & Inclusion Team on disabilityandinclusion@napier.ac.uk or with your Head of School.
 
For further information on fire evacuation and other health and safety matters visit our Health & Safety pages.

Pregnancy

Guidance for students on pregnancy, maternity, paternity and adoption.

The University is keen to support students during any period of pregnancy and maternity in the course of their studies. You should also inform a member of University staff as soon as possible in order to discuss the appropriate support for your pregnancy and post-natal period. Ideally, you should refer to your Personal Development Tutor (PDT).

Protection from Meningitis (MenACWY Vaccine)

Meningococcal ACWY immunisation- for first time University entrants

Meningitis and septicaemia (blood poisoning) are rare, but life threatening diseases. They are caused by several groups of meningococcal bacteria- the most common types are A, B, C, W and Y. Young people have the highest risk of contracting meningococcal disease, as well as children and babies. 

The meningococcal ACWY (MenACWY) vaccine helps protect against meningitis and septicaemia. Students starting University for the first time are at an increased risk of MenACWY disease because they are more likely to stay in halls of residence and have more close contact with new students, particularly during the first few weeks of term.

It is important that you are immunised at least two weeks before you attend University to make sure your immunity has fully built up. 

If you did not get MenACWY immunised before leaving for University, you can register with a new GP practice once you arrive and arrange to get the vaccine as soon as possible.

If you are postgraduate and have any queries about meningitis and septicaemia you should speak with your GP.

Information about vaccinations

Please refer to the Immunisation Scotland website for further information or call the NHS inform helpline on 0800 22 44 88 (text phone 18001 0800 22 44 88).

Rubella

Rubella (also known as German measles) is a viral infection that used to be common in children. It is usually a mild condition that gets better without treatment in seven to 10 days.

Symptoms of rubella include:
  • a red-pink skin rash made up of small spots
  • swollen glands around the head and neck
  • a high temperature (fever)
  • cold-like symptoms such as a cough and runny nose
  • aching and painful joints (more common in adults)
The symptoms of rubella usually only last a few days, but your glands may be swollen for several weeks.
 
Read more about the symptoms of rubella.

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) immunisation- for all students

Measles, mumps and rubella are highly infectious conditions that can have serious and potentially fatal complications.  The MMR vaccine is a safe and effective combined vaccine that protects against the three separate illnesses, in a single injection. The full course of the MMR vaccination requires two doses and should be given at least 4 weeks apart.  It is likely that you will have received one MMR immunisation as a baby or a child, but it is advised to check with your GP before arriving at University if both doses have been administered.

If you have not received the MMR vaccine before leaving for University, you can register with a new GP practice once you arrive and arrange to get the vaccine here as soon as possible.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs)

STIs, their existence, symptoms and consequences are very serious and it is worthwhile being aware of the uncomfortable, and sometimes lethal, problems of unprotected sex. The main problem with many STIs is that they can be carried unwittingly and therefore transmitted unknowingly to sexual partners. Contact your GP if you have any concerns. Visit the STIs pages from the NHS for more information.